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Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2018 Dec;275(12):3083-3086. doi: 10.1007/s00405-018-5164-4. Epub 2018 Oct 12.

The prevalence of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in patients with osteoporosis.

Author information

1
Apeldoorn Dizziness Centre, Gelre Hospital Apeldoorn, P.O. Box 9014, 7300 DS, Apeldoorn, The Netherlands. t.bruintjes@gelre.nl.
2
Apeldoorn Dizziness Centre, Gelre Hospital Apeldoorn, P.O. Box 9014, 7300 DS, Apeldoorn, The Netherlands.
3
Department of rheumatology, Gelre Hospital Apeldoorn, Apeldoorn, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is one of the most common causes of dizziness. There is some evidence that osteoporosis is a risk factor for BPPV.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of BPPV in patients with proven osteoporosis.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We examined 187 new consecutive patients who attended our osteoporosis clinic. All patients had proven osteoporosis (DEXA scan resulting in a T score ≤ - 2.5). Patients completed a screening questionnaire assessing the presence of episodic vertigo provoked by changes in head position. When we suspected the presence of BPPV, we performed a Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre and a supine roll test. If the diagnostic procedure was positive, a (therapeutic) canalith repositioning manoeuvre (CRM) was performed.

RESULTS:

Twelve out of 187 patients had a history of typical vertigo compatible with BPPV. In four patients, the presence of BPPV was confirmed by means of a positive Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre. The prevalence of BPPV in this population of patients with osteoporosis was 2.1% (95% CI 0.8-5.4%).

CONCLUSION:

The prevalence of BPPV in patients with osteoporosis is low. Based on this study, we suggest that there does not seem to be a relation between osteoporosis and BPPV.

KEYWORDS:

BPPV; Osteoporosis; Vertigo

PMID:
30315360
DOI:
10.1007/s00405-018-5164-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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