Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Res Vet Sci. 2018 Dec;121:12-17. doi: 10.1016/j.rvsc.2018.09.008. Epub 2018 Oct 2.

Distal limb pathologic conditions in horses treated with sleeve-style digital cryotherapy (285 cases).

Author information

1
Baker Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United States.
2
Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, Kennett Square, PA, United States.
3
Baker Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, United States. Electronic address: jet37@cornell.edu.

Abstract

Digital cryotherapy (DC) is frequently used as laminitis prophylaxis for horses. While DC with ice-water slurries is reported to be safe for up to 48 h, the safety of sleeve-style digital cryotherapy (SSDC) with ice in direct contact with the distal limb has not been evaluated. Our objective was to determine the incidence of distal limb pathologic conditions (DLPC) among horses treated with SSDC. A retrospective study of cases from 2011 to 2015 identified 285 horses treated with SSDC for a minimum of 12 h. Data collected from medical records included demographic, treatment, diagnostic, and SSDC treatment parameters. Bivariate statistics and a generalized linear regression model were created to evaluate risk factors associated with increased incidence of DLPC. Among horses treated with SSDC, 7% had tissue injury of the distal limb. Increasing duration of SSDC was associated with increased incidence of DLPC. Lesions observed included dermatitis, cellulitis, alopecia, coronitis, tissue necrosis, and distal limb edema. These lesions were similar to frostbite, non-freezing cold injury, and prolonged water immersion injuries seen in other species. While the incidence of DLPC was low, the authors recommend that horses undergoing SSDC with ice in direct contact with the skin should be monitored closely for injury when prolonged cryotherapy is clinically indicated. Further studies to improve safety, efficacy, and convenience of alternative methods of DC for horses are warranted.

KEYWORDS:

frostbite; icing; laminitis; non-freezing cold injury

PMID:
30308395
DOI:
10.1016/j.rvsc.2018.09.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center