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World Neurosurg. 2019 Jan;121:88-94. doi: 10.1016/j.wneu.2018.09.206. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

Meckel Cave Epidermoid Cyst Presenting as Multiple Cranial Nerve Deficits Due to Indirect Tumoral Compression of the Cavernous Sinus: A Case Report and Literature Review.

Author information

1
Section of Neurosurgery, Carilion Clinic, Roanoke, Virginia, USA; Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke, Virginia, USA; Virginia Tech School of Neuroscience, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA; Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA.
2
Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA.
3
College of Osteopathic Medicine, New York Institute of Technology, Glen Head, New York, USA.
4
Section of Neurosurgery, Carilion Clinic, Roanoke, Virginia, USA; Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke, Virginia, USA; Virginia Tech School of Neuroscience, Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. Electronic address: mrwitcher@carilionclinic.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Epidermoid cysts in Meckel cave are exceedingly rare. Since 1971, only 17 cases have been reported in the literature, with most patients presenting with trigeminal hypesthesia. However, outgrowth of these lesions from Meckel cave can rarely lead to compression of the proximate cavernous sinus and the neurovascular structures contained within. To date, 2 cases have reported a Meckel cave epidermoid cyst presenting clinically as an intracavernous cranial nerve palsy, presumably a clinical manifestation of cavernous sinus compression from the lesion.

CASE DESCRIPTION:

We describe a case involving a 51-year-old woman presenting with unilateral refractory trigeminal neuralgia, facial hypesthesia, abducens palsy, plus new-onset partial ptosis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the left Meckel cave that was T1 hypointense, T2 hyperintense, peripherally enhancing, and restricting diffusion. A stereotactic left subtemporal extradural approach was used to resect the lesion, which alleviated most of the patient's symptomatology except for minimal intermittent left-sided facial hypesthesia that remained at her 1-year postoperative visit.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is a unique report depicting an epidermoid cyst in the Meckel cave causing numerous cranial nerve deficits because of indirect tumoral compression of cranial nerves within the cavernous sinus.

KEYWORDS:

Cavernous sinus; Cholesteatoma; Epidermoid cyst; Meckel cave; Skull base; Trigeminal neuralgia

PMID:
30308341
DOI:
10.1016/j.wneu.2018.09.206
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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