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J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2019 Jul;77(7):1433.e1-1433.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.joms.2018.09.003. Epub 2018 Sep 13.

Relationship Between Nasal Fracture and Blowout Fracture: Can Nasal Fracture Be a Predictor of Blowout Fracture?

Author information

1
Professor, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu, Korea.
2
Resident, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu, Korea.
3
Fellow, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu, Korea.
4
Professor, Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu, Korea. Electronic address: kimyon@ynu.ac.kr.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Nasal and blowout fractures are the most common injuries from craniomaxillofacial trauma. Nasal fractures are easily diagnosed by clinical signs, such as pain and crepitus. However, blowout fractures are frequently asymptomatic and are easy to miss without computed tomographic (CT) scanning. This study analyzed the relation between the 2 fracture types to determine whether nasal fracture could be used as a predictor of blowout fracture.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

CT scans of 1,368 patients who underwent reduction surgery for nasal fracture were retrospectively reviewed. The pattern of nasal fractures (n = 1,368) was classified as frontal or lateral according to the direction of impact. Blowout fractures (n = 297) were classified into 3 types according to the position of the fracture: medial, inferior, or inferomedial wall. After calculating the number of patients in each group, the relation between nasal and blowout fracture types was statistically analyzed.

RESULTS:

Of 305 patients with frontal-type nasal fractures, the incidence of medial, inferior, and inferomedial wall fracture was 26, 7, and 9, respectively. Of 1,063 patients with lateral-type nasal fractures, the incidence of medial, inferior, and inferomedial wall fracture was 118, 75, and 62, respectively. Medial wall fracture was most common in the 2 nasal fracture groups and showed a higher frequency in the lateral-type group.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study showed a strong relation between nasal fractures and medial wall blowout fractures. If nasal fracture is suspected, especially the lateral type, then thorough examination for medial wall blowout fracture, with a high index of suspicion, should be performed.

PMID:
30308146
DOI:
10.1016/j.joms.2018.09.003

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