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J Cell Biochem. 2019 Mar;120(3):4342-4354. doi: 10.1002/jcb.27720. Epub 2018 Oct 9.

Comparing the efficacy of pain managements after total hip arthroplasty: A network meta-analysis.

Liu P1,2, Wu Y3,4, Liang Z1,2, Deng Y1,2, Meng Q1,2.

Author information

1
Second Department of Orthopedics, Affiliated Traditional Chinese Medical of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, Xinjiang, China.
2
Second Department of Orthopedics, Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous region, Urumqi, Xinjiang, China.
3
Third Department of Orthopedics, Affiliated Traditional Chinese Medical of Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, Xinjiang, China.
4
Third Department of Orthopedics, Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous region, Urumqi, Xinjiang, China.

Abstract

The aim of our current study is to compare efficiency of various interventions implemented for pain management after total hip arthroplasty (THA). PubMed and EMBASE were searched for randomized clinical trials (RCTs) reporting the pain scales for evaluate the efficacy of pain control after THA including at least one pair of direct control groups. Pain scale values and the associated 95% credible interval (CrI) were used to describe efficacy. Surface under the cumulative ranking curve (SUCRA) of each means of pain control was calculated to compare the relative ranking of different interventions. Thirty-five eligible literatures were involved in data analysis. The interventions for postoperative pain management we examined were psoas compartment block (PCB), posterior nerve block (PNB), fascia iliaca block (FIB), periarticular injection (PAI), femoral nerve block (FNB), lumbar plexus block (LPB), spinal anesthesia (SA), epidural analgesia (EPI), intrathecal morphine (IA), intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA), patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), onsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), local infiltration analgaesia (LIA), and reverse LIA (rLIA). In 0 to 6 hours analysis, patients under SA were found to have significantly lower pain score and SA was ranked the best. In 6 to 12 hours analysis, SA was found to be significantly more effective than other interventions and its SUCRA was the highest. No intervention showed a significant effect on reducing pain score for 12 to 24 hours and 24 to 48 hours after THA. SA is the best intervention to reduce THA postoperative pain in the first 24 hours. LPB is a better choice to reduce pain 12 to 48 hours after THA.

KEYWORDS:

THA; analgesia; anesthesia; network meta-analysis; postoperative pain management

PMID:
30302812
DOI:
10.1002/jcb.27720

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