Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cancer Nurs. 2018 Oct 6. doi: 10.1097/NCC.0000000000000648. [Epub ahead of print]

Does the Oral Administration of Ginger Reduce Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting?: A Meta-analysis of 10 Randomized Controlled Trials.

Author information

1
Author Affiliations: Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, Ministry of Health and Welfare, New Taipei City (Dr Chang); School of Nursing, College of Nursing, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (Dr Chang); and Department of Nursing, College of Nursing, Tzu Chi University, Hualien (Mr Peng), Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Preclinical tests in animals have shown that ginger extract can be used to treat chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV); however, research findings in clinical trials have not been conclusive.

OBJECTIVE:

Through this meta-analysis, we aimed to determine whether ginger could be used to treat CINV, which was interpreted using the PICOS (patient, problem/population, intervention, comparison, outcome, study) framework, with P being patients who underwent chemotherapy; I being 0.5 to 2.0 g/d of Zingiberaceae, Zintoma, dry ginger, ginger capsules, powdered ginger root, Zingiber officinale Roscoe, ginger extract, powdered ginger, 6-gingerol, or shogalos; C being placebo or standard care; and O being the relief, reduction, or improvement of CINV.

METHOD:

Via systematic literature review, we searched for studies in English from 2000 to 2017 in databases. We conducted a meta-analysis using Comprehensive Meta-analysis 2 on a total of 10 studies with complete data.

RESULTS:

The odds ratio (OR) of ginger in controlling CINV was 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.54-0.94; P = .015). Heterogeneity existed among the samples; therefore, we proceeded with a subgroup analysis and divided nausea and vomiting into acute or delayed. The results revealed that ginger could only reduce acute CINV in patients (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.42-0.86; P = .006), particularly acute vomiting (OR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.94; P = .025).

CONCLUSIONS:

Ginger displayed significant efficacy with regard to controlling CINV in the experimental groups.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

Our results could provide a reference for antiemetic methods to treat CINV and facilitate support for more clinical trials in the future to establish relevant guidelines.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer
Loading ...
Support Center