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Nat Med. 2018 Dec;24(12):1830-1836. doi: 10.1038/s41591-018-0196-2. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Wireless bioresorbable electronic system enables sustained nonpharmacological neuroregenerative therapy.

Koo J1,2, MacEwan MR3,4, Kang SK5,6, Won SM7, Stephen M3, Gamble P3, Xie Z2,8, Yan Y3, Chen YY7, Shin J7, Birenbaum N3,4, Chung S7, Kim SB7, Khalifeh J3, Harburg DV7, Bean K3, Paskett M3, Kim J9, Zohny ZS3, Lee SM1,2, Zhang R7, Luo K2,8, Ji B2,8, Banks A2,7, Lee HM10, Huang Y1,2,8, Ray WZ11,12, Rogers JA13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21.

Author information

1
Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
2
Department of Materials Science Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
3
Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA.
4
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA.
5
Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.
6
KAIST Institute for Health Science and Technology, Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.
7
Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA.
8
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA.
9
Department of Electronics Convergence Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Nowon-gu, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
10
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.
11
Department of Neurological Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. rayz@wudosis.wustl.edu.
12
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA. rayz@wudosis.wustl.edu.
13
Center for Bio-Integrated Electronics, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.
14
Department of Materials Science Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.
15
Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.
16
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.
17
Departments of Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.
18
Simpson Querrey Institute for Nano/biotechnology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.
19
McCormick School of Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.
20
Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.
21
Department of Neurological Surgery, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA. jrogers@northwestern.edu.

Abstract

Peripheral nerve injuries represent a significant problem in public health, constituting 2-5% of all trauma cases1. For severe nerve injuries, even advanced forms of clinical intervention often lead to incomplete and unsatisfactory motor and/or sensory function2. Numerous studies report the potential of pharmacological approaches (for example, growth factors, immunosuppressants) to accelerate and enhance nerve regeneration in rodent models3-10. Unfortunately, few have had a positive impact in clinical practice. Direct intraoperative electrical stimulation of injured nerve tissue proximal to the site of repair has been demonstrated to enhance and accelerate functional recovery11,12, suggesting a novel nonpharmacological, bioelectric form of therapy that could complement existing surgical approaches. A significant limitation of this technique is that existing protocols are constrained to intraoperative use and limited therapeutic benefits13. Herein we introduce (i) a platform for wireless, programmable electrical peripheral nerve stimulation, built with a collection of circuit elements and substrates that are entirely bioresorbable and biocompatible, and (ii) the first reported demonstration of enhanced neuroregeneration and functional recovery in rodent models as a result of multiple episodes of electrical stimulation of injured nervous tissue.

PMID:
30297910
DOI:
10.1038/s41591-018-0196-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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