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Alzheimers Dement. 2018 Nov;14(11):1397-1405. doi: 10.1016/j.jalz.2018.05.016. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Participant satisfaction with dementia prevention research: Results from Home-Based Assessment trial.

Author information

1
Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; James J Peters VAMC, Bronx, NY, USA. Electronic address: mary.sano@mssm.edu.
2
Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
3
Alzheimer Disease Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; James J Peters VAMC, Bronx, NY, USA; Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA.
4
Department of Neurology & Biostatistics, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
5
Center for Cognitive Neurology, New York University Langone Medical Center (posthumously), New York, NY, USA.
6
Department of Neurology and Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA.
7
Wisconsin Department of Health Services, Division of Care and Treatment Services, Mauston, WI, USA.
8
Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Little is known about factors affecting motivation and satisfaction of participants in dementia prevention trials.

METHODS:

A Research Satisfaction Survey was administered to 422 nondemented older adults who participated in the Home-Based Assessment trial.

RESULTS:

Overall satisfaction was high, with means of all individual items near to above a value of 3 on a scale from 1 (worst) to 4 (best). Greater satisfaction was associated with staff-administered interviews versus automated technologies. The most liked aspects of research participation were volunteerism, opportunity to challenge and improve mental function, and positive interactions with staff. The least liked aspect was repetitiveness of the assessments. Participants requested more contact with staff and other older adults and more feedback on performance.

DISCUSSION:

Older adults' participation in research was primarily motivated by altruism. Methodologies that facilitate human contact, encourage feedback and novelty of tasks should be incorporated into future trial design.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical Trial; Dementia prevention; Home-based assessment; Research satisfaction; Technology

PMID:
30297140
DOI:
10.1016/j.jalz.2018.05.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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