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Bioorg Med Chem. 2018 Nov 1;26(20):5397-5407. doi: 10.1016/j.bmc.2018.07.048. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

Discovery and biological evaluation of thiobarbituric derivatives as potent p300/CBP inhibitors.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049, China.
2
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China; Department of Chemistry, College of Sciences, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Shanghai 200444, China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China; School of Life Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, 100 Haike Road, Shanghai 201210, China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China.
5
State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China; Department of Pharmacy, Guiyang University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, South Dong Qing Road, Guizhou 550025, China.
6
State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China; Jiangsu Key Laboratory for High Technology Research of TCM Formulae, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, 138 Xianlin Road, Nanjing 210023, China.
7
State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China. Electronic address: zhangyy@simm.ac.cn.
8
Shanghai ChemPartner Co., LTD., Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park, Shanghai 201203, China.
9
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049, China.
10
State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049, China; Open Studio for Druggability Research of Marine Natural Products, Pilot National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology (Qingdao), 1 Wenhai Road, Aoshanwei, Jimo, Qingdao 266237, China.
11
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049, China. Electronic address: zhoubing@simm.ac.cn.
12
State Key Laboratory of Drug Research, CAS Key Laboratory of Receptor Research, Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 555 Zuchongzhi Road, Shanghai 201203, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049, China; Open Studio for Druggability Research of Marine Natural Products, Pilot National Laboratory for Marine Science and Technology (Qingdao), 1 Wenhai Road, Aoshanwei, Jimo, Qingdao 266237, China. Electronic address: cluo@simm.ac.cn.

Abstract

Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) relieve transcriptional repression by preferentially acetylation of ε-amino group of lysine residues on histones. Dysregulation of HATs is strongly correlated with etiology of several diseases especially cancer, thus highlighting the utmost significance of the development of small molecule inhibitors against this potential therapeutic target. In the present study, through virtual screening and iterative optimization, we identified DCH36_06 as a bona fide, potent p300/CBP inhibitor. DCH36_06 mediated p300/CBP inhibition leading to hypoacetylation on H3K18 in leukemic cells. The suppression of p300/CBP activity retarded cell proliferation in several leukemic cell lines. In addition, DCH36_06 arrested cell cycle at G1 phase and induced apoptosis via activation of capase3, caspase9 and PARP that elucidated the molecular mechanism of its anti-proliferation activity. In transcriptome analysis, DCH36_06 altered downstream gene expression and apoptotic pathways-related genes verified by real-time PCR. Importantly, DCH36_06 blocked the leukemic xenograft growth in mice supporting its potential for in vivo use that underlies the therapeutic potential for p300/CBP inhibitors in clinical translation. Taken together, our findings suggest that DCH36_06 may serve as a qualified chemical tool to decode the acetylome code and open up new opportunities for clinical intervention.

KEYWORDS:

Drug discovery; Epigenetics; Histone acetyltransferase; P300/CBP

PMID:
30297119
DOI:
10.1016/j.bmc.2018.07.048
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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