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J Hum Nutr Diet. 2019 Apr;32(2):198-225. doi: 10.1111/jhn.12601. Epub 2018 Oct 7.

A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition interventions for chronic noncancer pain.

Author information

1
Faculty of Health and Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia.
2
Priority Research Centre in Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia.
3
Hunter Integrated Pain Service, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This systematic review aimed to evaluate the impact of nutrition interventions on participant reported pain severity and intensity in populations with chronic pain.

METHODS:

Eight databases were systematically searched for studies that included adult populations with a chronic pain condition, a nutrition intervention and a measure of pain. Where possible, data were pooled using meta-analysis. Seventy-one studies were included, with 23 being eligible for meta-analysis.

RESULTS:

Studies were categorised into four groups: (i) altered overall diet with 12 of 16 studies finding a significant reduction in participant reported pain; (ii) altered specific nutrients with two of five studies reporting a significant reduction in participant reported pain; (iii) supplement-based interventions with 11 of 46 studies showing a significant reduction in pain; and (iv) fasting therapy with one of four studies reporting a significant reduction in pain. The meta-analysis found that, overall, nutrition interventions had a significant effect on pain reduction with studies testing an altered overall diet or just one nutrient having the greatest effect.

CONCLUSIONS:

This review highlights the importance and effectiveness of nutrition interventions for people who experience chronic pain.

KEYWORDS:

chronic pain; dietary intake; supplements

PMID:
30294938
DOI:
10.1111/jhn.12601

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