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Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging. 2019 Jan;4(1):39-49. doi: 10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.08.004. Epub 2018 Aug 25.

Alterations in Resting-State Networks Following In Utero Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Exposure in the Neonatal Brain.

Author information

1
Graduate Program in Neuroscience, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
2
MRI Research Facility, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
3
Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
4
Division of Neurology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; MRI Research Facility, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
5
Research Institute, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
6
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
7
Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; Research Institute, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada.
8
Department of Paediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
9
Division of Developmental Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; Research Institute, BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver, Canada. Electronic address: toberlander@bcchr.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are commonly used to treat depression during pregnancy. SSRIs cross the placenta, inhibit serotonin reuptake, and thereby are thought to alter central fetal serotonin signaling. Both prenatal maternal mood disturbances and in utero SSRI exposure have been associated with altered fetal and infant behavior. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging has identified resting-state networks (RSNs) in newborns, reflecting functional capacity of auditory and visual networks and providing opportunities to examine early experiences effects on neurodevelopment. We sought to examine the effect of in utero SSRI exposure on neonatal RSN functional organization. We hypothesized that prenatal SSRI exposure would be associated with alterations in neonatal RSNs compared with healthy control infants and infants exposed to mothers with depression.

METHODS:

Clinician-rated Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and self-reported Pregnancy Experiences Scale were completed during the third trimester. Control (n = 17), maternal depression-exposed (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale ≥8 without SSRI exposure, n = 16), and SSRI-exposed (n = 20) 6-day-old neonates underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Independent component analysis was used as a data-driven approach to extract 22 RSNs.

RESULTS:

SSRI-exposed neonates had higher connectivity in a putative auditory RSN compared with depressed-only (p = .01) and control (p = .02) infants (corrected for multiple comparisons), controlling for sex, age at the magnetic resonance imaging, and Pregnancy Experiences Scale score.

CONCLUSIONS:

Hyperconnectivity in auditory RSN in neonates with in utero SSRI exposure relative to neonates of depressed but not pharmacologically treated mothers and control infants may offer an insight into the functional organization origins of shifts in language perception and altered language development, previously reported in infants and children with prenatal SSRI exposure.

KEYWORDS:

Maternal depression; Neonatal neurodevelopment; Resting-state functional MRI; Resting-state networks; SSRIs; Serotonin

PMID:
30292808
DOI:
10.1016/j.bpsc.2018.08.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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