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Curr Pain Headache Rep. 2018 Oct 5;22(12):78. doi: 10.1007/s11916-018-0735-z.

Episodic Migraine With and Without Aura: Key Differences and Implications for Pathophysiology, Management, and Assessing Risks.

Author information

1
Graham Headache Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1153 Centre St Suite 4H, Jamaica Plain, Boston, MA, 02130, USA.
2
Graham Headache Center, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1153 Centre St Suite 4H, Jamaica Plain, Boston, MA, 02130, USA. rburch@bwh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

To review the pathophysiologic, epidemiologic, and clinical evidence for similarities and differences between migraine with and without aura.

RECENT FINDINGS:

The ICHD-3 has recently refined the diagnostic criteria for aura to include positive symptomatology, which better differentiates aura from TIA. Although substantial evidence supports cortical spreading depression as the cause of visual aura, the role (if any) of CSD in headache pain is not well understood. Recent imaging evidence suggests a possible hypothalamic origin for a headache attack, but further research is needed. Migraine with aura is associated with a modest increase in the risk of ischemic stroke. The etiology for this association remains unclear. There is a paucity of evidence regarding treatments specifically aimed at the migraine with aura subtype, or whether migraine with vs without aura responds to treatment differently. Migraine with typical aura is therefore often treated similarly to migraine without aura. Lamotrigine, daily aspirin, and flunarizine have evidence for efficacy in prevention of migraine with aura, and magnesium, ketamine, furosemide, and single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation have evidence for use as acute treatments. Although triptans have traditionally been contraindicated in hemiplegic migraine and migraine with brainstem aura, this prohibition is being reconsidered in the face of evidence suggesting that use may be safe. The debate as to whether migraine with and without aura are different entities is ongoing. In an era of sophisticated imaging, genetic advancement, and ongoing clinical trials, efforts to answer this question are likely to yield important and clinically meaningful results.

KEYWORDS:

Aura treatment; Brainstem aura; Cardiovascular risk; Hemiplegic migraine; Migraine; Migraine pathophysiology; Migraine with aura

PMID:
30291554
DOI:
10.1007/s11916-018-0735-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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