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Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2018 Oct 5. doi: 10.1007/s00167-018-5190-1. [Epub ahead of print]

Individuals with recurrent ankle sprain demonstrate postural instability and neuromuscular control deficits in unaffected side.

Author information

1
Department of Sports Medical Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Anam Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 02841, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea.
4
Department of Sports Medical Center, Korea University College of Medicine, Anam Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. opmanse@gmail.com.
5
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul, 02841, Republic of Korea. opmanse@gmail.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare proprioception, postural stability, and neuromuscular control between patients with mechanical laxity and recurrent ankle sprain.

METHODS:

Among 86 patients with ankle instability, 45 patients had mechanical laxity (mean age 27.2 ± 7.0 years) and 41 had recurrent ankle sprain (mean age 25.1 ± 9.2 years). Both the affected and unaffected ankles of each patient were evaluated. Proprioception and neuromuscular control tests were conducted using an isokinetic machine, and postural stability was tested using a postural stabilometry system.

RESULTS:

Proprioception was not significantly different between the unaffected or affected ankles of the mechanical laxity group compared with those of the recurrent ankle sprain group (n.s). Static and dynamic postural stability and neuromuscular control were similar in the affected ankles between the two groups (n.s). However, postural stability (static, overall: p = 0.009, anterior-posterior: p = 0.028, medial-lateral: p = 0.022; dynamic, overall: p = 0.012, anterior-posterior: p = 0.004, medial-lateral: p = 0.001) and neuromuscular control (inversion: p = 0.031, eversion: p = 0.039, dorsiflexion: p = 0.029, plantarflexion: p = 0.035) were significantly decreased in the unaffected ankles of the recurrent ankle sprain group compared with those of the mechanical laxity group.

CONCLUSION:

The unaffected ankles of the recurrent ankle sprain group showed significant decreases in both postural stability and neuromuscular control compared with the mechanical laxity group. Clinicians and therapists should consider unaffected ankle rehabilitation in patients with recurrent ankle sprain to prevent future sprain events.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:

Case-control study, III.

KEYWORDS:

Mechanical laxity; Neuromuscular control; Postural stability; Proprioception; Recurrent ankle sprain

PMID:
30291398
DOI:
10.1007/s00167-018-5190-1

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