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J Diabetes Complications. 2018 Dec;32(12):1148-1152. doi: 10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2018.09.014. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Comorbid hypertension and diabetes among U.S. women of reproductive age: Prevalence and disparities.

Author information

1
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Campus Box 7460, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7460, United States. Electronic address: lbritton@email.unc.edu.
2
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Campus Box 7460, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7460, United States. Electronic address: dberry@email.unc.edu.
3
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Gillings School of Global Public Health, Department of Maternal and Child Health, Campus Box 7445, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7445, United States. Electronic address: jon_hussey@unc.edu.

Abstract

AIMS:

Diabetes is associated with significant pregnancy complications, which can be further exacerbated by comorbid hypertension. Racial/ethnic differentials in the burden of comorbid hypertension and diabetes among women of reproductive age have not been described.

METHODS:

Using Wave IV of the nationally representative National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), we analyzed survey and biological data from 6576 non-pregnant women who were aged 24-32 in 2007-2008. Hypertension and diabetes were identified by self-report of diagnosis and biological measurements taken during in-home interviews. We used logistic regression models to predict the presence of comorbid hypertension and diabetes and whether each was diagnosed.

RESULTS:

Over a third (36.0%) of women with diabetes had comorbid hypertension. Compared to non-Hispanic white women, more non-Hispanic black women had comorbid hypertension and diabetes (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 5.93, 95% CI 3.84-9.16), and, if comorbid, were less likely to have a diabetes diagnosis (aOR 0.03, 95% CI 0.007-0.1) or hypertension diagnosis (aOR 0.22, 95% CI 0.08-0.65).

CONCLUSION:

Comorbid hypertension and diabetes are more common among non-Hispanic black women and less likely to be diagnosed, signaling disparities threatening maternal and child health among women with diabetes.

KEYWORDS:

Comorbidity; Complications; Diabetes; Hypertension; Preconception care; Women's health

PMID:
30291018
PMCID:
PMC6289742
DOI:
10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2018.09.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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