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BMC Vet Res. 2018 Oct 5;14(1):304. doi: 10.1186/s12917-018-1628-4.

The analgesic effects of buprenorphine (Vetergesic or Simbadol) in combination with carprofen in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy: a randomized, blinded, clinical trial.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences and Animal Pharmacology Research Group of Quebec (GREPAQ; Groupe de recherche en pharmacologie animale du Québec), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Université de Montréal, 3200 rue Sicotte, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 2M2, Canada.
2
Zoetis Inc, Parsippany, NJ, USA.
3
Department of Clinical Sciences and Animal Pharmacology Research Group of Quebec (GREPAQ; Groupe de recherche en pharmacologie animale du Québec), Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Université de Montréal, 3200 rue Sicotte, Saint-Hyacinthe, QC, J2S 2M2, Canada. paulo.steagall@umontreal.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Buprenorphine is a potent lipophilic opioid analgesic that is largely used in the multimodal treatment of acute pain. Simbadol (buprenorphine hydrochloride) is the first and only FDA-approved high-concentration formulation of buprenorphine for use in cats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy of carprofen in combination with one of two commercial formulations of buprenorphine (Simbadol and Vetergesic, 1.8 mg/mL and 0.3 mg/mL, respectively) in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Twenty-four dogs were included in a randomized, prospective, controlled, clinical trial. Patients were randomly divided into 2 groups as follows. Dogs were premedicated with acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg) and either 0.02 mg/kg of Vetergesic or Simbadol intramuscularly (Vetergesic group - VG; Simbadol group - SG, respectively; n = 12/group). General anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen. Carprofen (4.4 mg/kg SC) was administered after induction of anesthesia. Heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure, pulse oximetry, pain scores using the Glasgow Composite Pain Scale Short Form (CMPS-SF), sedation scores using a dynamic interactive visual analogue scale and adverse events were evaluated before and after ovariohysterectomy by an observer who was unaware of treatment administration. If CMPS-SF scores were ≥ 5/20, dogs were administered rescue analgesia (morphine 0.5 mg/kg IM). Statistical analysis was performed using linear mixed models and Fisher's exact test (p < 0.05).

RESULTS:

Pain and sedation scores and physiological parameters were not significantly different between treatments. Three dogs in VG (25%) and none in SG (0%) required rescue analgesia (p = 0.109). Adverse effects (i.e. vomiting and melena) were observed in two dogs in SG and were thought to be related to stress and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug toxicity.

CONCLUSIONS:

The administration of buprenorphine with carprofen preoperatively provided adequate postoperative analgesia for the majority of dogs undergoing OVH without serious adverse events. Prevalence of rescue analgesia was not significantly different between groups; however, it could be clinically relevant and explained by a type II error (i.e. small sample size). Future studies are necessary to determine if analgesic efficacy after Simbadol and Vetergesic is related to individual variability or pharmacokinetic differences.

KEYWORDS:

Analgesia; Buprenorphine; Canine; Ovariohysterectomy; Pain; Simbadol; Vetergesic

PMID:
30290820
PMCID:
PMC6173890
DOI:
10.1186/s12917-018-1628-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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