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Nat Plants. 2018 Oct;4(10):777-783. doi: 10.1038/s41477-018-0260-4. Epub 2018 Oct 1.

Complete substitution of a secondary cell wall with a primary cell wall in Arabidopsis.

Author information

1
Bioproduction Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan.
2
School of Biosciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
3
Department of Wood Science, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
4
Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, Saitama, Japan.
5
Max-Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam, Germany.
6
Department of Plant Biology and Genome Center, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
7
Technology Center, Taisei Corporation, Yokohama, Japan.
8
Bioproduction Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan. nobutaka.mitsuda@aist.go.jp.

Abstract

The bulk of a plant's biomass, termed secondary cell walls, accumulates in woody xylem tissues and is largely recalcitrant to biochemical degradation and saccharification1. By contrast, primary cell walls, which are chemically distinct, flexible and generally unlignified2, are easier to deconstruct. Thus, engineering certain primary wall characteristics into xylem secondary walls would be interesting to readily exploit biomass for industrial processing. Here, we demonstrated that by expressing AP2/ERF transcription factors from group IIId and IIIe in xylem fibre cells of mutants lacking secondary walls, we could generate plants with thickened cell wall characteristics of primary cell walls in the place of secondary cell walls. These unique, newly formed walls displayed physicochemical and ultrastructural features consistent with primary walls and had gene expression profiles illustrative of primary wall synthesis. These data indicate that the group IIId and IIIe AP2/ERFs are transcription factors regulating primary cell wall deposition and could form the foundation for exchanging one cell wall type for another in plants.

Comment in

PMID:
30287954
DOI:
10.1038/s41477-018-0260-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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