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PLoS One. 2018 Oct 4;13(10):e0204830. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0204830. eCollection 2018.

The effect of naltrexone as a carboplatin chemotherapy-associated drug on the immune response, quality of life and survival of dogs with mammary carcinoma.

Author information

1
Department of Anatomy, Pathology and Veterinary Clinics, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
2
Laboratory of Immunology and Molecular Biology, Institute of Health Sciences, Federal University of Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil.
3
Laboratory of Diagnostic and Monitoring Biomarkers, Research Center René Rachou, Oswaldo Cruz Foundation, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
4
Center for Agrarian, Environmental and Biological Sciences, Federal University of Recôncavo da Bahia, Cruz das Almas, Bahia, Brazil.
5
Department of Agrarian and Environmental Sciences, Estadual University of Santa Cruz, Ilhéus, Bahia, Brazil.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-dose naltrexone (LDN) as a carboplatin chemotherapy-associated drug in female dogs with mammary carcinoma in benign mixed tumors (MC-BMT) after mastectomy and to assess its association with quality of life and survival rates. Sixty female dogs were included in this study, all of which had histopathological diagnosis of MC-BMT and were divided into three groups: G1 (control), consisting of animals submitted only to mastectomy with or without regional metastasis; G2, composed of treated animals that did not present with metastasis; and G3, treated dogs that presented with metastasis. G2 and G3 were also subdivided according to the treatment administered: chemotherapy alone (MC-BMT(-) C/MC-BMT(+) C) or LDN and chemotherapy (MC-BMT(-) C+LDN/MC-BMT(+) C+LDN). All animals were subjected to clinical evaluation, mastectomy, peripheral blood lymphocyte immunophenotyping, beta-endorphin and met-enkephalin quantification, and evaluation of survival rates and quality of life scores. The results showed higher serum concentrations of beta-endorphin and met-enkephalin, fewer chemotherapy-related side effects, and better quality of life and survival rates in the LDN-treated groups than in LDN-untreated groups (P < 0.05). Evaluation of clinical and pathological parameters indicated a significant association between the use of LDN and both prolonged survival and enhanced quality of life. These results indicate that LDN is a viable chemotherapy-associated treatment in female dogs with MC-BMT, maintaining their quality of life and prolonging survival rates.

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