Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Geriatr. 2018 Oct 1;18(1):232. doi: 10.1186/s12877-018-0916-y.

Effects of 12-month home-based physiotherapy on duration of living at home and functional capacity among older persons with signs of frailty or with a recent hip fracture - protocol of a randomized controlled trial (HIPFRA study).

Author information

1
Rehabilitation, South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Valto Käkelän katu 3, FI-53130, Lappeenranta, Finland. paula.soukkio@eksote.fi.
2
Rehabilitation, South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Valto Käkelän katu 3, FI-53130, Lappeenranta, Finland.
3
Aureolis Oy, Hevosenkenkä 3, FI-02600, Espoo, Finland.
4
Department of General Practice and Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Unit of Primary Health Care, Tukholmankatu 8 B, FI-00290, Helsinki, Finland.
5
Gerontology Research Center, Unit of Health Sciences, University of Jyväskylä, Rautpohjankatu 8, FI-40700, Jyväskylä, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Health concerns, such as frailty and osteoporotic fractures decrease functional capacity and increase use of health and social care services in the aging population. The ability to continue living at home is dependent on functional capacity, which can be enhanced by rehabilitation. We study the effects of a 12-month home-based physiotherapy program with 12-month follow-up on duration of living at home, functional capacity, and the use of social and health care services among older persons with signs of frailty, or with a recently operated hip fracture.

METHODS:

This is a non-blinded, parallel group, randomized controlled trial performed in South Karelia Social and Health Care District, Finland (population 131,000). Three hundred community-dwelling older persons with signs of frailty (age ≥ 65) and 300 persons with a recent hip fracture (age ≥ 60) will be recruited. Frailty is screened by FRAIL questionnaire and verified by modified Fried's frailty criteria. Both patient groups will be randomized separately to a physiotherapy and a usual care arm. Individualized, structured and progressive physiotherapy will be carried out for 60 min, twice a week for 12 months at the participant's home. The primary outcome at 24 months is duration of living at home. Our hypothesis is that persons assigned to the physiotherapy arm will live at home for six months longer than those in the usual care arm. Secondary outcomes are functional capacity, frailty status, health-related quality-of-life, falls, use and costs of social and health care services, and mortality. Assessments, among others Short Physical Performance Battery, Functional Independence Measure, Mini Nutritional Assessment, and Mini-Mental State Examination will be performed at the participant's home at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Register data on the use and costs of social and health care services, and mortality will be monitored for 24 months.

DISCUSSION:

Our trial will provide new knowledge on the potential of intensive, long-term home-based physiotherapy among older persons at risk for disabilities, to enhance functional capacity and thereby to postpone the need for institutional care, and diminish the use of social and health care services.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02305433 , Registered Nov 28, 2014.

KEYWORDS:

Community-dwelling; Duration of living at home; Frail elderly; Functional capacity; Hip fractures; Home-based physiotherapy; Social and health care services

PMID:
30285645
PMCID:
PMC6167829
DOI:
10.1186/s12877-018-0916-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center