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Adv Mater. 2018 Nov;30(46):e1805165. doi: 10.1002/adma.201805165. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Spore Carbon from Aspergillus Oryzae for Advanced Electrochemical Energy Storage.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Applications for Batteries of Zhejiang Province, School of Materials Science & Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310027, China.
2
Guangdong Engineering and Technology Research Center for Advanced Nanomaterials, School of Environment and Civil Engineering, Dongguan University of Technology, Dongguan, 523808, China.

Abstract

Development of novel advanced carbon materials is playing a critical role in the innovation of electrochemical energy storage technology. Hierarchical porous spore carbon produced by Aspergillus oryzae is reported, which acts as a biofactory. Interestingly, the spore carbon not only shows a porous maze structure consisting of crosslinked nanofolds, but also is intrinsically N and P dual doped. Impressively, the spore carbon can be further embedded with Ni2 P nanoparticles, which serve as porogen to form a highly porous spore carbon/Ni2 P composite with increased surface area and enhanced electrical conductivity. To explore the potential application in lithium-sulfur batteries (LSBs), the spore carbon/Ni2 P composite is combined with sulfur, forming a composite cathode, which exhibits a high initial capacity of 1347.5 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C, enhanced cycling stability (73.5% after 500 cycles), and better rate performance than the spore carbon/S and artificial hollow carbon sphere/S counterparts. The synergistic effect on suppressing the shuttle effect of intermediate polysulfides is responsible for the excellent LSBs performance with the aid of a physical blocking effect arising from the electrical maze porous structure and the chemical adsorption effect originating from N, P dual doping and polarized compound Ni2 P.

KEYWORDS:

Aspergillus oryzae spores; Li-S batteries; cathode; nickel phosphide; spore carbon

PMID:
30285294
DOI:
10.1002/adma.201805165
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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