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Cancer Causes Control. 2018 Oct 3. doi: 10.1007/s10552-018-1086-0. [Epub ahead of print]

A qualitative study of Realtor knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to radon health effects: implications for comprehensive cancer control.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, MS F-76, Atlanta, GA, 30341-3717, USA. fqv6@cdc.gov.
2
SciMetrika, LLC, Durham, NC, USA.
3
ICF, Atlanta, GA, USA.
4
Center for Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
5
Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, MS F-76, Atlanta, GA, 30341-3717, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States, and radon exposure is the second leading risk factor. Fewer than 25% of existing U.S. homes have been tested for radon, and only 5-10% of new homes use some form of radon prevention.

OBJECTIVE:

This qualitative study sought to determine radon-related knowledge, attitudes, and practices among Realtors to inform cancer control activities at local and state levels.

METHODS:

We conducted focus groups with Realtors in four states to collect information about knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding radon.

RESULTS:

Realtors reported obtaining information on radon in similar ways, being aware of radon and its characteristics, and dealing with radon issues as a normal part of home sales. Differences in attitudes toward testing varied across states. Realtors in states with radon policies generally expressed more positive attitudes toward testing than those in states without policies. Radon mitigation was identified as an added expense to buyers and sellers. Realtors cited concerns about the reliability and credibility of mitigation systems and installers.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that attitudes and practices vary among Realtors and that additional educational resources about radon as a cancer risk factor may be beneficial. When comprehensive cancer control programs update their plans, they may want to add objectives, strategies, or activities to reduce radon exposure and prevent lung cancer. These activities could include partnering with Realtors to improve their knowledge, attitudes, and practices about radon, as well as developing and distributing radon educational resources.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Environment; Lung; Radon

PMID:
30284071
DOI:
10.1007/s10552-018-1086-0

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