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Arch Plast Surg. 2018 Sep;45(5):411-417. doi: 10.5999/aps.2018.00430. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Accessory auricle: Classification according to location, protrusion pattern and body shape.

Author information

1
Department of Plastic Surgery, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Plastic Surgery, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Accessory auricles (AAs) are common congenital anomalies. We present a new classification according to location and shape, and propose a system for coding the classifications.

METHODS:

This study was conducted by reviewing the records of 502 patients who underwent surgery for AA. AAs were classified into three anatomical types: intraauricular, preauricular, and buccal. Intraauricular AAs were divided into three subtypes: intracrural, intratragal, and intralobal. Preauricular AAs were divided into five subtypes: precrural, superior pretragal, middle pretragal, inferior pretragal, and prelobal. Buccal AAs were divided into two subtypes: anterior buccal and posterior buccal. AAs were also classified according to their protrusion pattern above the surrounding surface: pedunculated, sessile, areolar, remnant, and depressed. Pedunculated and sessile AAs were subclassified as spherical, ovoid, lobed, and nodular, according to their body shape. Cartilage root presence and family history of AA were reviewed. A coding system for these classifications was also proposed.

RESULTS:

The total number of AAs in the 502 patients was 1,003. Among the locations, the superior pretragal subtype (27.6%) was the most common. Among the protrusion patterns and shapes, pedunculated ovoid AAs were the most common in the preauricular (27.8%) and buccal areas (28.0%), and sessile lobed AAs were the most common in the intraauricular area (48.7%). The proportion of AAs with a cartilage root was 78.4%, and 11% of patients had a family history. The most common type of preauricular AA was the superior pretragal pedunculated ovoid AA (13.2%) with a cartilage root.

CONCLUSIONS:

This new system will serve as a guideline for classifying and coding AAs.

KEYWORDS:

Accessory auricle; Accessory tragus; Classification; Ear abnormalities; Embryology

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