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J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;66(1):307-318. doi: 10.3233/JAD-180360.

Amyloid and FDG PET of Successful Cognitive Aging: Global and Cingulate-Specific Differences.

Author information

1
Departments of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Some individuals, called Supernormals (SN), maintain excellent memory in old age. While brain structural and functional integrity in SN seem to be aging-resistant, their amyloidosis and neural injury status has not been well studied.

OBJECTIVE:

The goal of this study was to compare cortical amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism between SN and older adults with normal cognition (NC), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD).

METHODS:

Subjects from the ADNI database were included if they received T1-weighted MRI, amyloid PET, FDG-PET, and cognitive testing within a 6-month period, yielding 27 AD, 69 MCI, 172 NC, and 122 SN. PET standardized uptake value ratios (SUVrs) were calculated for the whole cortex and 68 regions of interest, with whole cerebellum serving as reference.

RESULTS:

SN had lower whole cortex amyloid than MCI, and higher glucose metabolism than all others. Regional analysis revealed that amyloid burden and glucose metabolism in the right isthmus cingulate cortex differed in SN compared to others, while SN glucose metabolism also differed from others in several frontal and temporal regions.

CONCLUSION:

Preserved cortical glucose metabolism, and lower levels of amyloidosis and glucose hypometabolism in the right isthmus cingulate cortex, contributes to the Supernormal phenomenon. These findings may be informative for development of early screening biomarkers and therapeutic targets for modification of cognitive trajectories.

KEYWORDS:

Amyloid-β; glucose metabolism; magnetic resonance imaging; positron emission tomography; successful cognitive aging; supernormal

PMID:
30282358
PMCID:
PMC6538036
DOI:
10.3233/JAD-180360
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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