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PeerJ. 2018 Sep 24;6:e5664. doi: 10.7717/peerj.5664. eCollection 2018.

Plurality in multi-disciplinary research: multiple institutional affiliations are associated with increased citations.

Author information

1
University of Melbourne, Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital, Centre for Eye Research Australia, Melbourne, Australia.
2
University of Western Australia, Lions Eye Institute, Centre for Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Perth, Australia.
3
School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Menzies Institute for Medical Research, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

Abstract

Background:

The institutional affiliations and associated collaborative networks that scientists foster during their research careers are salient in the production of high-quality science. The phenomenon of multiple institutional affiliations and its relationship to research output remains relatively unexplored in the literature.

Methods:

We examined 27,612 scientific articles, modelling the normalized citation counts received against the number of authors and affiliations held.

Results:

In agreement with previous research, we found that teamwork is an important factor in high impact papers, with average citations received increasing concordant with the number of co-authors listed. For articles with more than five co-authors, we noted an increase in average citations received when authors with more than one institutional affiliation contributed to the research.

Discussion:

Multiple author affiliations may play a positive role in the production of high-impact science. This increased researcher mobility should be viewed by institutional boards as meritorious in the pursuit of scientific discovery.

KEYWORDS:

Multiple Affiliations; Research Collaboration; Research Output.

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