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Food Chem Toxicol. 2018 Dec;122:33-37. doi: 10.1016/j.fct.2018.09.075. Epub 2018 Sep 29.

Preliminary assessment of galaxolide bioaccessibility in raw and cooked FISH.

Author information

1
Department of Analytical Chemistry and Organic Chemistry, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain.
2
Division of Aquaculture and Upgrading (DivAV), Portuguese Institute for the Sea and Atmosphere (IPMA, I.P), Lisbon, Portugal.
3
Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Reus, Catalonia, Spain.
4
Department of Analytical Chemistry and Organic Chemistry, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Catalonia, Spain. Electronic address: eva.pocurull@urv.cat.

Abstract

Generally, dietary intake assessment and risk characterization are evaluated using contaminant concentration in raw fish while it is usually ingested cooked, which can cause an overestimation because one of the essential issues for risk-benefit analysis is to determine the maximum amount of a contaminant that can be released from the food matrix and be absorbed by the human body, called bioaccessibility. Moreover, despite most seafood products are cooked before consumption, risk assessment is still evaluated in raw products, strongly affecting public health guidelines. In the present study, an in vitro bioaccessibility assay was performed for Galaxolide (HHCB) in fish samples. Raw spiked hake samples were in vitro digested and aliquots of each fraction of the digestion process were analysed. HHCB was quantitatively present in the bioaccessibility fraction. The effect of fish cooking on HHCB was also evaluated in cod and mackerel samples. Results demonstrate that steaming and grilling processes lead to a loss of 50-70% HHCB in fish.

KEYWORDS:

Bioaccessibility; Fish; Galaxolide; Grilling; Steaming

PMID:
30278243
DOI:
10.1016/j.fct.2018.09.075

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