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ACS Appl Mater Interfaces. 2018 Oct 31;10(43):36926-36932. doi: 10.1021/acsami.8b11877. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Impact of Strain-Induced Changes in Defect Chemistry on Catalytic Activity of Nd2NiO4+δ Electrodes.

Author information

1
Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) , Tsinghua University , 30 Shuang'qing Road , Beijing 100084 , P. R. China.
2
School of Advanced Materials, Shenzhen Graduate School , Peking University , Shenzhen 518055 , China.
3
Materials Science and Engineering , Georgia Institute of Technology , Atlanta , Georgia 30332-0245 , United States.

Abstract

It is well known that defect chemistry plays a vital role in determining the electronic structure, ionic conductivity, and catalytic activity of metal oxides, as demonstrated in perovskite-based oxides to achieve desired functionalities. In this work, we explored the possibility of tuning the defect chemistry and hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activity of Nd2NiO4+δ model thin films by controlling the lattice strain. Highly textured Nd2NiO4+δ thin films with different strain states were prepared on (110)- and (100)-oriented single-crystal yttrium-stabilized zirconium (YSZ) substrates using pulsed laser deposition. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results indicated that the NNO(100) film on the YSZ(110) substrate with larger tensile strain in the a- b plane and compressive strain along the c axis exhibited higher HOR activity than the NNO(110) film on the YSZ(100) substrate at 500-600 °C. The enhancement in HOR activity is attributed to the strain-induced difference in the oxygen defect concentration, as confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis. We believe that the correlation among the strain state, defect chemistry, and catalytic properties is helpful for rational design of more efficient electrode materials.

KEYWORDS:

hydrogen oxidation reaction; lattice strain; oxygen defect chemistry; perovskite-based oxides; thin film

PMID:
30277376
DOI:
10.1021/acsami.8b11877

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