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Clin Oral Investig. 2018 Oct 2. doi: 10.1007/s00784-018-2647-z. [Epub ahead of print]

Oral symptoms and oral health-related quality of life in patients with chronic kidney disease from predialysis to posttransplantation.

Author information

1
Head and Neck Center, Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, P.O.Box 263, Kasarmikatu 11-13, FI-00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland. hellevi.ruokonen@hus.fi.
2
Head and Neck Center, Oral and Maxillofacial Diseases, Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, P.O.Box 263, Kasarmikatu 11-13, FI-00029 HUS, Helsinki, Finland.
3
Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
4
Group Administration, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
5
Department of Social and Health Management, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
6
Abdominal Center, Nephrology, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
7
Folkhälsan Research Center, Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This prospective follow-up cohort study analyzed chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients' oral symptoms, health habits, and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), from predialysis to posttransplantation. A simplified questionnaire method (Oral Health Quality Score, OHQS), based on these and clinical findings, was constructed and tested for identifying patients in need for referral to a dentist.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Fifty-three CKD patients were followed up for a mean of 10.3 years. Clinical oral, radiological, and salivary examination was performed at baseline and posttransplantation. Total Dental Index (TDI) indicating inflammation was calculated. The patients filled out a questionnaire on symptoms, oral hygiene and health care habits, smoking, alcohol use, and medication. General health-related quality of life was assessed with the 15-dimensional (15D) instrument at posttransplantation. Descriptive and analytical methods were used in statistics.

RESULTS:

OHQS significantly correlated with high TDI (p = 0.017), number of teeth (p = 0.031), and unstimulated salivary flow rate (p = 0.001) in transplanted patients. Number of daily medications showed a negative correlation with the OHQS (r = - 0.30; p = 0.028). The prevalence of oral symptoms was slightly, but not significantly, more common posttransplantation compared with predialysis stage.

CONCLUSION:

OHQS identified patients with high oral inflammatory score thus confirming our study hypothesis.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Use of OHQS and measuring salivary flow indicate patients at risk for oral diseases. These markers might be easy to use chair-side also by auxiliary personnel.

KEYWORDS:

Burning mouth sensation; Kidney diseases; Oral health; Organ transplants; Self-care; Xerostomia

PMID:
30276517
DOI:
10.1007/s00784-018-2647-z
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