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Trop Med Infect Dis. 2018 Jun 4;3(2). pii: E59. doi: 10.3390/tropicalmed3020059.

Scabies in Resource-Poor Communities in Nasarawa State, Nigeria: Epidemiology, Clinical Features and Factors Associated with Infestation.

Author information

1
Parasitology Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Ilorin, PMB 1515 Ilorin, Nigeria. samugbomoiko@yahoo.com.
2
Parasitology Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Ilorin, PMB 1515 Ilorin, Nigeria. oyedejisamed@gmail.com.
3
Parasitology Unit, Department of Zoology, University of Ilorin, PMB 1515 Ilorin, Nigeria. olas4nice2004@yahoo.co.uk.
4
Department of Community Health, School of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Fortaleza CE 60430-140, Brazil. heukelbach@web.de.
5
College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, Division of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville 4811, Australia. heukelbach@web.de.

Abstract

Epidemiology and clinical features of scabies remain largely unknown in Nigeria's rural communities. To fill this gap, we performed a cross-sectional study in three rural communities in north central Nigeria. A total of 500 individuals were included and examined for scabies infestation; a questionnaire was applied to collect socio-demographic and behavioral data. Scabies was diagnosed in 325 (65.0%) participants. Excoriations (68.6%), vesicles (61.8%), and papules (58.8%) were common skin lesions. Itching was the most common symptom (77.5%); 64% complained of sleep disturbances. Lymphadenopathy was identified in 48.3%. Lesions were most commonly encountered on the abdomen (35.5%), inguinal area (19.1%), and interdigital spaces (14.2%). Poverty-related variables, such as illiteracy (OR: 7.15; 95% CI: 3.71⁻13.95), low household income (7.25; 1.19⁻88.59), absence of a solid floor inside house (12.17; 2.83⁻52.34), and overcrowding (1.98; 1.08⁻2.81) were significantly associated with infestation. Individual behavior, such as sharing of beds/pillows (2.11; 1.42⁻3.14) and sharing of clothes (2.51; 1.57⁻3.99), was also highly significantly associated with scabies. Regular bathing habits (0.37; 0.24⁻0.56) and regular use of bathing soap (0.36; 0.21⁻0.53) were protective factors. Scabies is extremely common in the communities under study and is associated with considerable morbidity. The disease is intrinsically linked with extreme poverty.

KEYWORDS:

Nigeria; cross-sectional study; epidemiology; parasitic skin disease; scabies

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