Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2018;27(5):962-967. doi: 10.6133/apjcn.042018.01.

Serum vitamin D decreases during chemotherapy: an Australian prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. lisenrin@bond.edu.au.
2
School of Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
3
Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Robina, Australia.
4
Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Australia.
5
Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia.
6
Flinders Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University, Bedford Park, Australia.
7
University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore, Australia.
8
Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
9
Princess Alexandra Hospital Division of Cancer Services and University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
10
Department of Medical Oncology, Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, Australia.
11
Flinders University, Bedford Park, Australia.
12
Flinders Centre for Innovation in Cancer, Bedford Park, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Vitamin D plays an important role in bone and muscle function, and cell prolifera-tion. The impact of chemotherapy and associated behavioural changes such as fatigue and sun avoidance on vit-amin D (25(OH) D) is unknown. This study aims to evaluate variations in serum vitamin D during chemotherapy and the predictive value of latitude, season and pre-existing vitamin D deficiency.

METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN:

A 12-week prospective cohort study was conducted in chemotherapy-naïve patients in two Australian locations with different sun exposure. Vitamin D deficiency was defined as ≤25 nmol/L and insufficiency 26-50 nmol/L 25(OH) D. Demographics, chemotherapy regimen, nutritional status, sun exposure, geographic location, and sea-son were collected at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks after commencing chemotherapy.

RESULTS:

Eighty-five patients (μ55.3±13.4 years of age; 49% female) were recruited, 96% Caucasian. Fifty-four patients were treated with cura-tive intent (mostly for breast [n=29] or colorectal [n=12] cancers). At baseline, 10 patients were vitamin D defi-cient and 33 were insufficient. Mean serum 25(OH) D (nmol/L) was higher at latitude -27.5o (Brisbane) than lati-tude -34.9o (Adelaide) (μ61.9±22.1 vs μ42.2±19.2, p<0.001) and varied according to season (spring: μ46.9±20.3, summer: μ50.8±18.2, autumn: μ76.4±25.2, winter: μ36.5±15.7, p<0.001). Serum 25(OH) D decreased with chemotherapy (baseline: μ49.2±22.3, 6-weeks: μ40.9±19.0, 12-weeks: μ45.9±19.7, p=0.05), with a significant and more rapid decline in winter and autumn (p=0.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

Chemotherapy is associated with a decrease in serum vitamin D, particularly during winter and autumn. Investigations into the underlying mechanism and as-sociated potential outcomes with this decrease requires further investigation.

PMID:
30272842
DOI:
10.6133/apjcn.042018.01
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HEC Press, Healthy Eating Club PTY LTD
Loading ...
Support Center