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Phys Ther Sport. 2018 Nov;34:121-128. doi: 10.1016/j.ptsp.2018.09.007. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Low load resistance training with blood flow restriction decreases anterior knee pain more than resistance training alone. A pilot randomised controlled trial.

Author information

1
Aspetar, Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar; Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Thessaly, Trikala, Greece. Electronic address: Vasileios.Korakakis@aspetar.com.
2
Aspetar, Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate if application of blood flow restriction (BFR) combined with low-load resistance training (LLRT) would induce significant anterior knee pain (AKP) reduction compared to LLRT alone.

DESIGN:

Randomised Controlled Trial.

SETTING:

Institutional physiotherapy clinic.

PARTICIPANTS:

Forty males suffering from AKP were randomly allocated in the LLRT-BFR or LLRT group. BFR was applied at 80% of complete vascular occlusion. Four sets of open kinetic chain knee extensions were implemented in both groups using a pain monitoring model.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Pain (0-10) was assessed immediately after LLRT-BFR or LLRT application and after a physiotherapy session (45 min) during shallow and deep single-leg squat (SLSS, SLSD), and step-down test (SDT).

RESULTS:

Significant immediate pain reduction was found in LLRT-BFR group in SLSS, SLSD and SDT (d = 1.32, d = 1.12, d = 0.88 respectively), but no difference was found in LLRT group. Following the physiotherapy session pain reduction was sustained in LLRT-BFR group in both SLSs and SDT (d = 1.32, d = 0.78, d = 0.89 respectively). For the control group significant pain reduction was only found in SLSS (d = 0.56). No significant between-group differences were observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

The pain reduction induced by LLRT-BFR could indicate this intervention as a preconditioning process prior to the rehabilitation of AKP.

KEYWORDS:

Blood flow restriction; Ischaemia; Occlusion; Rehabilitation; Resistance training

PMID:
30268966
DOI:
10.1016/j.ptsp.2018.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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