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J Electromyogr Kinesiol. 2018 Dec;43:95-103. doi: 10.1016/j.jelekin.2018.09.009. Epub 2018 Sep 22.

Individuals with sacroiliac joint dysfunction display asymmetrical gait and a depressed synergy between muscles providing sacroiliac joint force closure when walking.

Author information

1
University of Colorado, Boulder, Department of Integrative Physiology, Neurophysiology of Movement Laboratory, Applied Biomechanics Laboratory, 354 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Electronic address: Daniel.feeney@colorado.edu.
2
University of Colorado, Boulder, Department of Integrative Physiology, Neurophysiology of Movement Laboratory, Applied Biomechanics Laboratory, 354 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Electronic address: Robyn.capobianco@colorado.edu.
3
University of Colorado, Boulder, Department of Integrative Physiology, Neurophysiology of Movement Laboratory, Applied Biomechanics Laboratory, 354 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Electronic address: Jana.jeffers@colorado.edu.
4
Center for Spine and Orthopedics, 9005 Grant St, Suite 200, Thornton, CO 80229, USA. Electronic address: morrealj@gmail.com.
5
University of Colorado, Boulder, Department of Integrative Physiology, Neurophysiology of Movement Laboratory, Applied Biomechanics Laboratory, 354 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA; VA Eastern Colorado Healthcare System, Denver, CO, USA. Electronic address: Alena.grabowski@colorado.edu.
6
University of Colorado, Boulder, Department of Integrative Physiology, Neurophysiology of Movement Laboratory, Applied Biomechanics Laboratory, 354 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Electronic address: Roger.enoka@colorado.edu.

Abstract

Walking is often compromised in individuals with low back and hip disorders, such as sacroiliac joint dysfunction (SIJD). The disorder involves reduced coactivation of the gluteus maximus and contralateral latissimus dorsi, which together provide joint stability during walking. The purpose of our study was to compare the kinematics and contributions of selected muscles to identified synergies during walking between healthy individuals and those with SIJD. Six women with unilateral SIJD and six age-matched healthy controls walked on a force-measuring treadmill at 1 m/s while we recorded kinematics and the activity of 16 muscles with surface EMG. Non-negative matrix factorization was used to identify patterns of EMG activity (muscle synergies). Individuals with SIJD exhibited less hip extension and lower peak vertical ground reaction forces on the affected side than the unaffected side. In contrast to controls, the SIJD group also displayed a depressed muscle synergy between gluteus maximus on the affected side and the contralateral latissimus dorsi. The results indicate that individuals with SIJD exhibited both reduced activation of gluteus maximus during a loading synergy present in walking and greater asymmetry between legs when walking compared with age-matched controls.

KEYWORDS:

Biomechanics; Electromyography; Kinematics; Muscle onset timing; Muscle synergies; Sacroiliac joint

PMID:
30267967
DOI:
10.1016/j.jelekin.2018.09.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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