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J Cancer Educ. 2018 Sep 28. doi: 10.1007/s13187-018-1432-7. [Epub ahead of print]

Identification of Factors Associated with Hematology-Oncology Fellow Academic Success and Career Choice.

Author information

1
Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Building 10th floor, 10-90E, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. marshall.ariela@mayo.edu.
2
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. marshall.ariela@mayo.edu.
3
Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
4
Division of Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Building 10th floor, 10-90E, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA.
5
Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Abstract

Factors affecting hematology-oncology trainees' academic success and career choices have not been well characterized. We performed a retrospective study of 57 hematology-oncology fellows trained at Mayo Clinic between 2008 and 2017 in an attempt to identify factors associated with success during fellowship and with career choice (academic versus private). Sex, age, residency quality, and letters of recommendation indicating a "top" applicant were not associated with hematology or oncology in-training examination (ITE) scores, research productivity (abstracts/publications during fellowship), or career choice (academic versus private). Fellows with higher United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) scores were more likely to perform well on ITE, but examination scores did not predict academic productivity or academic versus private career choice. More academically productive fellows were more likely to choose academic careers. Both ITE scores and productivity were associated with receipt of national and/or institutional awards. Finally, fellows who were non-US citizens and/or international medical graduates (IMG) had higher academic productivity both pre-fellowship and during fellowship and as per the observations above were more likely to choose academic careers. In conclusion, predictors of superior knowledge differ from predictors of academic productivity/career choice, and it is important to take multiple factors into account when selecting candidates most likely to succeed during fellowship.

KEYWORDS:

Fellowship; Hematology; Medical education; Oncology; Outcomes

PMID:
30267295
DOI:
10.1007/s13187-018-1432-7

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