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Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf. 2018 Dec;27(12):1344-1355. doi: 10.1002/pds.4643. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Comparing outpatient oral antibiotic use in Germany and the Netherlands from 2012 to 2016.

Author information

1
German Institute for Drug Use Evaluation (DAPI), Berlin, DE, Germany.
2
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Toxicology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Medicine, ABDA-Federal Union of German Associations of Pharmacists, Berlin, DE, Germany.
4
Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Biochemistry, Institute of Pharmacy, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Berlin, DE, Germany.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Overuse of antibiotics is of concern, but may differ between European countries. This study compares outpatient use of oral antibiotics between Germany (DE) and the Netherlands (NL).

METHODS:

For DE, we used the DAPI database with information on dispensings at the expense of the Statutory Health Insurance Funds from > 80% of community pharmacies. For NL, data were obtained from the Dutch Foundation for Pharmaceutical Statistics. Use of oral antibiotics was estimated as defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID), except for age comparisons as packages per 1000 inhabitants annually. National time trends were assessed with linear regression, stratified for the major antibiotic classes, and individual substances.

RESULTS:

From 2012 to 2016, outpatient antibiotic use was lower in NL than in DE (9.64 vs 14.14 DID in 2016) and non-significantly decreased slightly over time in both countries. In DE, dispensings of oral antibiotics to children were higher compared with NL for the age groups 2 to 5 (2.0-fold in 2016) and 6 to 14 years (2.7-fold in 2016). Use of cephalosporins was very low in NL (0.02 DID in 2016), but the second most frequently dispensed class in DE (2.95 DID in 2016).

CONCLUSION:

From 2012 to 2016, outpatient use of oral antibiotics was lower in NL than in DE. Differences were primarily observed in the age groups 2 to 5 and 6 to 14 years, although the recommendations of evidence-based guidelines in both countries were in agreement.

KEYWORDS:

Germany; Netherlands; ambulatory care; anti-bacterial agents; drug utilization; pharmacoepidemiology

PMID:
30264894
PMCID:
PMC6585743
DOI:
10.1002/pds.4643
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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