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Prev Med Rep. 2018 Sep 11;12:158-163. doi: 10.1016/j.pmedr.2018.09.008. eCollection 2018 Dec.

Pharmaceutical use according to participation in worksite wellness screening and health campaigns.

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1
Department of Public Health, College of Life Sciences, Brigham Young University, United States of America.

Abstract

This study evaluated whether participation in worksite wellness screening and health campaigns influences the number and cost (USD) of pharmacy medication claims. Analyses are based on 2531 workers employed all four academic years in a large school district in the western United States, 2010-11 through 2013-14. Mean and ratio comparisons were adjusted by age, sex, year, and baseline health. Approximately 84.2% of employees participated in wellness screening and 60.1% completed one or more health campaigns. Those completing wellness screening were 1.09 (95% CI 1.06-1.13) times more likely to file a claim. Mean total cost remained near $934 (SD = $3695) over the academic years, positively associated with years of wellness screening, suggesting increased awareness of the need for medication through screening. Women were 1.02 (95% CI 1.00-1.05) times more likely than men to participate in wellness screening and had greater total pharmacy cost ($990.6 [SD = $4023.7] vs. $777.9 [SD = $2580.5], p = 0.0104). Women were 1.38 (95% CI 1.32-1.44) times more likely to complete a health campaign. Mean number of pharmacy claims was lower (9.8 vs. 10.6, p = 0.0069) in those completing at least one health campaign, suggesting greater health orientation in women. Those completing at least one health campaign were 0.96 (95% CI 0.92-0.99) times as likely to have a total cost of medication above the median, 0.94 (95% CI 0.88-1.01) as likely to have a total cost of medication above the 75th percentile, and 0.84 (0.75-0.96) times as likely to have a total cost above the 90th percentile.

KEYWORDS:

Biometric evaluation; Health risks; Incentives; Prevention; Screening; Worksite wellness

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