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J Voice. 2018 Sep 24. pii: S0892-1997(18)30150-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jvoice.2018.07.023. [Epub ahead of print]

Development of Excised Larynx.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.
2
Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China.
3
University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Madison, Wisconsin.
4
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, China; University of Wisconsin-Madison, School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Madison, Wisconsin. Electronic address: jjjiang@wisc.edu.

Abstract

The larynx is a complex organ which has a role in a variety of functions such as phonation, breathing, and swallowing. To research these functions, it is widely accepted that in vivo studies provide more anatomically and physiologically relevant findings. However, invasive procedures are generally needed to measure variables such a subglottal pressure, vocal fold tension and stiffness, and cricothyroid muscle stretch. Performing studies using excised larynges is a useful technique which makes it possible to not only measure phonation parameters but control them as well. Early studies using excised larynges mainly focused on controlling specific parameters and mathematical modeling simulations. The use of these studies has helped further research in laryngeal anatomy, imaging techniques, as well as aerodynamic, acoustic, and biomechanical properties. Here, we describe the progress of this research over the past 5 years. The number of accepted animal models has increased and ideas from excised larynx studies are starting to be applied to treatment methods for laryngeal disorders. These experiments are only valid for an excised situation and must continue to be combined with animal experimentation and clinical observations.

KEYWORDS:

Biomechanical Properties; Clinical Applications; Excised larynx; Laryngoplasty; Phonation

PMID:
30262190
PMCID:
PMC6431582
[Available on 2020-03-24]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvoice.2018.07.023

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