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Neuroimage. 2018 Dec;183:972-984. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.09.060. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Extending the Human Connectome Project across ages: Imaging protocols for the Lifespan Development and Aging projects.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Electronic address: mharms@wustl.edu.
2
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA; Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
4
Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA; Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA; Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
7
Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
8
Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA; Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA; Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
9
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
10
Department of Neuroscience, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
11
Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
12
Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA.
13
Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA; Department of Neuroscience, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA; St. Luke's Hospital, St. Louis, MO, USA.
14
Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
15
Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA.
16
Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
17
Center for Brain Science, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA; Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
18
Centro Fermi - Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche "Enrico Fermi", Rome, Italy.
19
Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Oxford Big Data Institute, Li Ka Shing Centre for Health Information and Discovery, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Department of Statistics, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
20
Department of Biomedical Engineering, King's College London, London, UK.
21
Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging, Oxford Centre for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain (FMRIB), Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK; Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.
22
Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
23
Department of Radiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.
24
Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
25
Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Abstract

The Human Connectome Projects in Development (HCP-D) and Aging (HCP-A) are two large-scale brain imaging studies that will extend the recently completed HCP Young-Adult (HCP-YA) project to nearly the full lifespan, collecting structural, resting-state fMRI, task-fMRI, diffusion, and perfusion MRI in participants from 5 to 100+ years of age. HCP-D is enrolling 1300+ healthy children, adolescents, and young adults (ages 5-21), and HCP-A is enrolling 1200+ healthy adults (ages 36-100+), with each study collecting longitudinal data in a subset of individuals at particular age ranges. The imaging protocols of the HCP-D and HCP-A studies are very similar, differing primarily in the selection of different task-fMRI paradigms. We strove to harmonize the imaging protocol to the greatest extent feasible with the completed HCP-YA (1200+ participants, aged 22-35), but some imaging-related changes were motivated or necessitated by hardware changes, the need to reduce the total amount of scanning per participant, and/or the additional challenges of working with young and elderly populations. Here, we provide an overview of the common HCP-D/A imaging protocol including data and rationales for protocol decisions and changes relative to HCP-YA. The result will be a large, rich, multi-modal, and freely available set of consistently acquired data for use by the scientific community to investigate and define normative developmental and aging related changes in the healthy human brain.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Connectomics; Development; Diffusion; Functional connectivity; Lifespan; Perfusion; Resting-state; Task

PMID:
30261308
PMCID:
PMC6484842
[Available on 2019-12-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.09.060
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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