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PLoS Biol. 2018 Sep 27;16(9):e3000014. doi: 10.1371/journal.pbio.3000014. eCollection 2018 Sep.

Haves and have nots must find a better way: The case for open scientific hardware.

Maia Chagas A1,2,3,4,5.

Author information

1
Werner Reichardt Centre for Integrative Neurosciences, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
2
Graduate School for Neural and Behavioural Sciences, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
3
TReND in Africa gUG, Bonn, Germany.
4
Institute of Ophthalmic Research, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
5
School of Life Sciences, University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Many efforts are making science more open and accessible; they are mostly concentrated on issues that appear before and after experiments are performed: open access journals, open databases, and many other tools to increase reproducibility of science and access to information. However, these initiatives do not promote access to scientific equipment necessary for experiments. Mostly due to monetary constraints, equipment availability has always been uneven around the globe, affecting predominantly low-income countries and institutions. Here, a case is made for the use of free open source hardware in research and education, including countries and institutions where funds were never the biggest problem.

PMID:
30260950
PMCID:
PMC6177193
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pbio.3000014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

I have read the journal’s policy and the author of this manuscript has the following competing interests: Editor of the Open Source Toolkit Channel for PLOS.

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