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J Psychopharmacol. 2018 Sep 27:269881118799954. doi: 10.1177/0269881118799954. [Epub ahead of print]

Cannabidiol treatment reduces the motivation to self-administer methamphetamine and methamphetamine-primed relapse in rats.

Author information

1
1 Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW, Australia.
2
2 School of Psychology, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.
3
3 Department of Pharmacology, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.
4
4 Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Methamphetamine is an addictive stimulant that can cause many adverse physical, psychological and psychosocial effects. Preliminary evidence shows cannabidiol, a non-intoxicating constituent of the cannabis plant, may have efficacy in treating opioid and nicotine dependence. However, no study has yet examined whether cannabidiol treatment might impact on methamphetamine addiction.

AIMS:

The current study investigated whether cannabidiol administration reduces the motivation to self-administer methamphetamine and relapse to methamphetamine-seeking behavior following abstinence.

METHODS:

Thirty-two male Sprague Dawley rats with implanted jugular vein catheters were initially trained to self-administer methamphetamine via lever press during two-hour sessions on a fixed ratio 1 schedule of reinforcement. Rats in experiment 1 ( n=16) then advanced to a progressive ratio reinforcement schedule to examine the effects of cannabidiol (0, 20, 40, and 80 mg/kg intraperitoneal) on motivation to self-administer methamphetamine. Rats in experiment 2 ( n=16) were tested for cannabidiol effects on methamphetamine-primed reinstatement following extinction.

RESULTS:

Cannabidiol (80 mg/kg, but not 40 mg/kg, or 20 mg/kg) reduced the motivation to self-administer methamphetamine and attenuated methamphetamine-primed relapse to methamphetamine-seeking behavior after extinction.

CONCLUSION:

This is the first demonstration that cannabidiol can reduce the motivation to seek and consume methamphetamine, and suggests that cannabidiol might be worth trialing as a novel pharmacotherapy for methamphetamine dependence.

KEYWORDS:

Addiction; cannabidiol; methamphetamine; relapse; self-administration

PMID:
30260267
DOI:
10.1177/0269881118799954

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