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Alzheimers Dement (N Y). 2018 Sep 6;4:444-449. doi: 10.1016/j.trci.2018.08.005. eCollection 2018.

Amyloid-associated increases in longitudinal report of subjective cognitive complaints.

Author information

1
Center for Alzheimer Research and Treatment, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
2
Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
3
Florey Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
4
Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
5
Department of Neurology, Stanford Medical School, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
6
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

Introduction:

To investigate whether baseline subjective cognitive complaints (SCCs) predict longitudinal decline on neuropsychological testing and whether SCC increases longitudinally, in the setting of high levels of amyloid burden.

Methods:

Two hundred seventy-nine clinically normal older participants (mean age = 73.7 ± 6.1 years) from the Harvard Aging Brain Study, a cohort of community-dwelling individuals, were followed longitudinally (4.27 ± 1.35 years) with annual subjective memory questionnaires and neuropsychological assessment. 11C Pittsburgh compound-B positron emission tomography was used to measure cortical amyloid and to classify status (Aβ+/Aβ-) at baseline.

Results:

Higher baseline SCC predicted more rapid cognitive decline on neuropsychological measures among those with elevated amyloid (t = -2.18, P < .0001). In addition, longitudinal report of SCC significantly increased over time, with SCC progression most pronounced among Aβ+ individuals (t = 2.24, P = .0005).

Discussion:

SCC may inform risk for future cognitive decline and track progression of self-perceived decline, particularly in those along the AD trajectory, providing potentially important indicators of clinical meaningfulness in AD prevention trials.

KEYWORDS:

Amyloid; PET imaging; Preclinical Alzheimer's disease; Subjective cognitive decline

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