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Nature. 2018 Sep;561(7724):479-484. doi: 10.1038/s41586-018-0531-2. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Combination therapy with anti-HIV-1 antibodies maintains viral suppression.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA.
2
Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Institute of Virology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
3
Department I of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
4
German Center for Infection Research, partner site Bonn-Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
5
Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.
6
Praxis am Ebertplatz, Cologne, Germany.
7
Methods in Medical Informatics, Department of Computer Science, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
8
Duke Human Vaccine Institute, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
9
Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, USA.
10
Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
11
Department of Immunology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
12
Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA.
13
Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA.
14
Medical Faculty, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
15
German Center for Infection Research, partner site Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
16
Max Planck Institute for Informatics, Saarbrücken, Germany.
17
Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
18
Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Institute of Virology, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany. florian.klein@uk-koeln.de.
19
German Center for Infection Research, partner site Bonn-Cologne, Cologne, Germany. florian.klein@uk-koeln.de.
20
Center for Molecular Medicine Cologne (CMMC), University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. florian.klein@uk-koeln.de.
21
Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. mcaskey@rockefeller.edu.
22
Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. nussen@rockefeller.edu.
23
Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA. nussen@rockefeller.edu.

Abstract

Individuals infected with HIV-1 require lifelong antiretroviral therapy, because interruption of treatment leads to rapid rebound viraemia. Here we report on a phase 1b clinical trial in which a combination of 3BNC117 and 10-1074, two potent monoclonal anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies that target independent sites on the HIV-1 envelope spike, was administered during analytical treatment interruption. Participants received three infusions of 30 mg kg-1 of each antibody at 0, 3 and 6 weeks. Infusions of the two antibodies were generally well-tolerated. The nine enrolled individuals with antibody-sensitive latent viral reservoirs maintained suppression for between 15 and more than 30 weeks (median of 21 weeks), and none developed viruses that were resistant to both antibodies. We conclude that the combination of the anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies 3BNC117 and 10-1074 can maintain long-term suppression in the absence of antiretroviral therapy in individuals with antibody-sensitive viral reservoirs.

PMID:
30258136
PMCID:
PMC6166473
[Available on 2019-03-26]
DOI:
10.1038/s41586-018-0531-2

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