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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Oct 9;115(41):10505-10510. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1802018115. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Functionally specific optogenetic modulation in primate visual cortex.

Chernov MM1, Friedman RM2, Chen G3,4,5,6, Stoner GR7, Roe AW1,3,4,5,6.

Author information

1
Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, OR 97006; chernov@ohsu.edu annawang@zju.edu.cn.
2
Division of Neuroscience, Oregon National Primate Research Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, OR 97006.
3
Interdisciplinary Institute of Neuroscience and Technology, Qiushi Academy for Advanced Studies, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029, China.
4
College of Biomedical Engineering and Instrument Science, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China.
5
School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.
6
College of Biomedical Engineering and Instrument Science, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Cardio-Cerebral Vascular Detection Technology and Medicinal Effectiveness Appraisal, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, China.
7
Vision Center Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, CA 92037.

Abstract

In primates, visual perception is mediated by brain circuits composed of submillimeter nodes linked together in specific networks that process different types of information, such as eye specificity and contour orientation. We hypothesized that optogenetic stimulation targeted to cortical nodes could selectively activate such cortical networks. We used viral transfection methods to confer light sensitivity to neurons in monkey primary visual cortex. Using intrinsic signal optical imaging and single-unit electrophysiology to assess effects of targeted optogenetic stimulation, we found that (i) optogenetic stimulation of single ocular dominance columns (eye-specific nodes) revealed preferential activation of nearby same-eye columns but not opposite-eye columns, and (ii) optogenetic stimulation of single orientation domains increased visual response of matching orientation domains and relatively suppressed nonmatching orientation selectivity. These findings demonstrate that optical stimulation of single nodes leads to modulation of functionally specific cortical networks related to underlying neural architecture.

KEYWORDS:

cortical columns; functional connectivity; nonhuman primates; optogenetics; primary visual cortex

PMID:
30257948
PMCID:
PMC6187135
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1802018115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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