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Sci Total Environ. 2019 Feb 15;651(Pt 1):909-916. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.09.267. Epub 2018 Sep 21.

Succession and diversity of microbial communities in landfills with depths and ages and its association with dissolved organic matter and heavy metals.

Author information

1
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012, China; State Environmental Protection Key laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012, China; College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin 541006, China.
2
School of Life Sciences and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan 610031, China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012, China; State Environmental Protection Key laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012, China; College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Guilin University of Technology, Guilin 541006, China. Electronic address: hexs@craes.org.cn.
4
State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012, China; State Environmental Protection Key laboratory of Simulation and Control of Groundwater Pollution, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012, China.

Abstract

Landfill is an important method for the treatment of municipal solid wastes. Microbes play a central role in the biodegradation and stabilization of organic matter during landfill; however, the succession of microbial communities in landfills and their association with organic matter still remain unclear. This study investigated the succession and diversity of microorganisms in landfill depending on different depths and ages as well as its association with dissolved organic matter (DOM) and heavy metals. The results showed that the actinobacterial diversity and richness were high compared to bacteria in young landfill cells. The diversity and richness of bacteria and actinobacterial were the highest in the middle layer in the intermediate and old landfill cells. Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria were the most dominant phyla. Firmicutes were mainly affected by the humification degree, and the aromatic and protein-like substance content of the landfill-derived DOM. The phylum Proteobacteria was greatly affected by the lipid and humic-like substances content of the landfill-derived DOM, while the distribution of Actinobacteria was regulated by both aromatic and humic-like substances. The effect of dissolved heavy metals on the microbial distribution in landfill differed for the metals Cr, Ni, Pb, Mn, Cu, Zn, and Cd. Siderophile elements (Cr, Ni, and Pb) were necessary trace elements for Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, and promoted their growth. Oxyphilic element (Mn) was an important factor promoting the growth of Actinobacteria. However, no apparent relationship was found between sulfurophile elements (Cu, Zn, and Cd) and microorganisms.

KEYWORDS:

Actinobacterial community; Bacterial community; Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE); Dissolved organic matter (DOM); Landfill

PMID:
30257230
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.09.267
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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