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BMC Infect Dis. 2018 Sep 25;18(1):478. doi: 10.1186/s12879-018-3398-9.

Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae strains in children with acute otitis media- high risk of persistent colonization after treatment.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology with Laboratory for Microbiological Diagnostics, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1 Street, 20-093, Lublin, Poland. iza.glowniak@umlub.pl.
2
Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Phoniatrics and Audiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland.
3
Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology with Laboratory for Microbiological Diagnostics, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1 Street, 20-093, Lublin, Poland.
4
Department of Medical Microbiology, Medical University of Lublin, Lublin, Poland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite advances in the development of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, acute otitis media (AOM) is a common childhood infection, caused mainly by Streptococcus pneumoniae. It has been suggested that persistence of pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage is a risk factor for subsequent recurrent infections.

METHODS:

In this study we evaluate the relationship between 55 pneumococcal strains obtained from nasopharynx/oropharynx (NP/OP) and middle ear fluid (MEF) of 62 children, aged between 1 and 16 years, during AOM (including recurrent/treatment failure AOM, and post-treatment visits), based on their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics performed by analyses of serotype, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and multilocus sequence typing.

RESULTS:

S.pneumoniae was isolated from 27.4% of MEF samples; it constituted 43.6% of all positive bacterial samples from MEF samples. There was statistically significant concordance between isolation from the MEF sample and NP/OP colonization by S. pneumoniae (p < 0.0001). During post-treatment visits S.pneumoniae was isolated from 20.8% of children; 91% of them were positive in pneumococcal NP/OP culture during AOM. The serotypes belonging to 10- and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccines constituted 84% and 92% of the strains, respectively. Multidrug resistance was found in 84% of the strains. According to multivariate analysis, pneumococcal colonization after antibiotic therapy was significantly associated with shorter length of therapy in children with bilateral AOM.

CONCLUSIONS:

High persistent prevalence of antibiotic-resistant S.pneumoniae strains in children with AOM after unsuccessful bacterial eradication may presumably be regarded as a predisposing factor of infection recurrence.

KEYWORDS:

Acute otitis media; Antibiotic resistance; MLST; Risk factors; Streptococcus pneumoniae

PMID:
30253754
PMCID:
PMC6156860
DOI:
10.1186/s12879-018-3398-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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