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Int J Endocrinol. 2018 Sep 3;2018:6874395. doi: 10.1155/2018/6874395. eCollection 2018.

Thyroid Function in Korean Adolescents with Obesity: Results from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey VI (2013-2015).

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, St. Vincent's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 16247, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, 148 Gurodong-ro, Guro-gu Seoul 08308, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 82 Gumi-ro 173 Beon-gil, Bundang-gu, Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do 13620, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Korea University Ansan Hospital, 123 Jeokgeum-ro, Danwon-gu, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do 15355, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, 120-1 Neungdong-ro, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 05030, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Korea University Anam Hospital, 73 Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu Seoul 02841, Republic of Korea.
7
Department of Pediatrics, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 06591, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

Purpose:

In this study, we investigated the status of thyroid function and its association with metabolic risk factors in Korean adolescents.

Methods:

Among 2679 subjects aged 10-19 years who participated in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey VI (2013-2015), 1067 adolescents (M = 559, F = 508) with available data on free T4 (FT4) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) were included. Study participants were classified into normal weight [body mass index (BMI) below 85th percentile, 80.7%], overweight (85th ≤ BMI< 95th percentile, 8.7%), and obesity (BMI ≥ 95th percentile, 10.6%).

Results:

With increasing levels of BMI category, the means of TSH increased (2.73 ± 0.06, 2.77 ± 0.02, and 3.24 ± 0.22 mIU/L, P = 0.031) and FT4 decreased (1.30 ± 0.01, 1.26 ± 0.02, and 1.25 ± 0.02 ng/mL, P = 0.001). Positive linear associations were observed between TSH and BMI z-score (P = 0.031), waist circumference (P = 0.013), waist-height ratio (P = 0.002), systolic blood pressure (P = 0.001), total cholesterol (P = 0.008), and triglyceride (P = 0.002) after adjusting for age and sex. With per-unit increase in TSH, the odds ratios of having abdominal obesity (OR = 1.18, 95% CI, 1.01-1.38) and triglyceride ≥ 150 mg/dL (OR = 1.18, 95% CI, 1.04-1.34) were significantly increased after adjusting for age, sex, and BMI.

Conclusions:

In adolescents with obesity, TSH was higher and FT4 was lower than in adolescents with normal weight. Hyperthyrotropinemia was associated with abnormal metabolic risk factors including abdominal obesity and elevated triglyceride.

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