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Nat Neurosci. 2018 Oct;21(10):1370-1379. doi: 10.1038/s41593-018-0236-8. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

Author information

1
Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Programs, Institute for Cell Engineering, Department of Neurology; and Department of Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences, Solomon H. Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. tdawson@jhmi.edu.
2
Adrienne Helis Malvin Medical Research Foundation, New Orleans, LA, USA. tdawson@jhmi.edu.
3
McKnight Brain Institute Center for Translational Research in Neurodegenerative Disease Department of Neuroscience and Neurology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. tgolde@mbi.ufl.edu.
4
Department of Neurology, MassGeneral Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease (MIND), Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. clagier-tourenne@mgh.harvard.edu.
5
Broad Institute of Harvard University and MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. clagier-tourenne@mgh.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Animal models of adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases have enhanced the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Nevertheless, our understanding of these disorders and the development of mechanistically designed therapeutics can still benefit from more rigorous use of the models and from generation of animals that more faithfully recapitulate human disease. Here we review the current state of rodent models for Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We discuss the limitations and utility of current models, issues regarding translatability, and future directions for developing animal models of these human disorders.

PMID:
30250265
DOI:
10.1038/s41593-018-0236-8

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