Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Indian J Ophthalmol. 2018 Oct;66(10):1456-1461. doi: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_1251_17.

Clinical profile of childhood blindness and inappropriate enrolment of children in schools for visually impaired in Uttar Pradesh, India.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatric ophthalmology, Strabismus and Neuro-Ophthalmology, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India.
2
Department of Optometry and Visual science, Anterior Segment and Refractive Surgery C L Gupta Eye Institute, Ram Ganga Vihar Phase II, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India.
3
Department of Community Outreach, Anterior Segment and Refractive Surgery C L Gupta Eye Institute, Ram Ganga Vihar Phase II, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India.
4
Department of Clinical Research, Anterior Segment and Refractive Surgery C L Gupta Eye Institute, Ram Ganga Vihar Phase II, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India.
5
Department of Cornea, Anterior Segment and Refractive Surgery C L Gupta Eye Institute, Ram Ganga Vihar Phase II, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India.

Abstract

Purpose:

To assess major causes of severe visual impairment (SVI)/blindness (BL) in children studying in schools for the blind in western Uttar Pradesh, India and the extent of inappropriate enrolment of children in blind schools.

Methods:

Students of five schools for the blind were examined in a tertiary care eye hospital. The anatomical sites and etiology for SVI/BL were recorded using the World Health Organization/Prevention of Blindness standard reporting form. Categorical variable were summarized using frequencies and percentages.

Results:

A total of 93 students were examined. Male/Female ratio was 3.4:1. The most common anatomical sites of SVI/BL were the whole globe (40.3%) and the cornea (26.4%). Postnatal or childhood causes were noted in 13.8% cases. Forty-one (56.9%) students had hereditary diseases which was most likely caused by chromosomal abnormalities. Three students were having an associated disability, one was deaf and mute, one was physically handicapped, and one was intellectually challenged. Fifty-four (58%) children were blind and 21 (22.6%) children had no visual impairment but were studying in schools for the blind.

Conclusion:

Schools for the blind should be screened routinely to reduce the incidence of misdiagnosed visual impairment. This will prevent inappropriate enrolment and will definitely help in reducing the social and economic burden of society and of the schools of blind too.

KEYWORDS:

Childhood blindness; India; congenital anomalies; schools for the blind; visual impairment

PMID:
30249833
PMCID:
PMC6173027
DOI:
10.4103/ijo.IJO_1251_17
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Medknow Publications and Media Pvt Ltd Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center