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J Parkinsons Dis. 2018;8(4):503-510. doi: 10.3233/JPD-181389.

Investigating Voice as a Biomarker for Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2-Associated Parkinson's Disease.

Author information

1
Somerville College, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
2
The Edmond J. Safra Program in Parkinson's Disease and the Morton and Gloria Shulman Movement Disorders Centre and, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada.
3
Department of Medicine, Parkinson's Disease and Movement Disorders Center, Division of Neurology, The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa Brain and Mind Institute, Ottawa, Canada.
4
Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
5
Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
6
Department of Neurology, Movement Disorders Center, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA.
7
Engineering and Applied Science, Aston University, Birmingham, UK.
8
Media Lab, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Abstract

We investigate the potential association between leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) mutations and voice. Sustained phonations ('aaah' sounds) were recorded from 7 individuals with LRRK2-associated Parkinson's disease (PD), 17 participants with idiopathic PD (iPD), 20 non-manifesting LRRK2-mutation carriers, 25 related non-carriers, and 26 controls. In distinguishing LRRK2-associated PD and iPD, the mean sensitivity was 95.4% (SD 17.8%) and mean specificity was 89.6% (SD 26.5%). Voice features for non-manifesting carriers, related non-carriers, and controls were much less discriminatory. Vocal deficits in LRRK2-associated PD may be different than those in iPD. These preliminary results warrant longitudinal analyses and replication in larger cohorts.

KEYWORDS:

LRRK2 mutation; Parkinson’s disease; biomarker; voice

PMID:
30248062
DOI:
10.3233/JPD-181389
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