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Phys Ther. 2019 Jan 1;99(1):14-27. doi: 10.1093/ptj/pzy112.

Video-Game-Based Exercises for Older People With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Controlledtable Trial (GAMEBACK).

Author information

1
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, 75 East St, Lidcombe, NSW 2141, Australia.
2
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney.
3
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, and Center for Advanced Orthopaedic Studies, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
Department of Physiotherapy, Westmead Public Hospital, Western Sydney Local Health District, Westmead, NSW, Australia.
5
Department of Physiotherapy, Westmead Public Hospital, Western Sydney Local Health District.

Abstract

Background:

Video game technology increases adherence to home exercise and could support self-management for older people with chronic low back pain (LBP).

Objective:

The objective was to investigate the effects of home-based video game exercises on pain self-efficacy and care-seeking in older people with chronic LBP.

Design:

The study was a randomized controlled trial.

Setting:

The setting was a community and waiting list.

Participants:

Sixty participants, aged > 55 years with chronic LBP, were randomized (1:1) to Wii Fit U exercises or to continue their usual activities for 8 weeks.

Intervention:

The intervention was home-based Wii Fit U flexibility, strengthening, and aerobic exercises for 60 minutes, 3 times per week, with fortnightly calls from a physical therapist.

Measurements:

Measurements included pain self-efficacy and care-seeking (primary outcomes), and physical activity, pain, function, disability, fear of movement/reinjury, falls efficacy, recruitment and response rates, adherence, experience with the intervention, and adverse events (secondary outcomes).

Results:

The mean age of participants was 67.8 (standard deviation = 6.0) years. Adherence to the total recommended exercise time was 70.8%, and no adverse events were reported. Participants completing Wii Fit U exercises had significantly higher pain self-efficacy at 6 months, but not immediately postintervention or at 3 months; there were no between-group differences in care-seeking. Compared with the control group, participants completing Wii Fit U exercises demonstrated significantly greater improvements in pain and function at 8 weeks and were more likely to engage in flexibility exercises at 6 months. There were no significant between-group differences for the remaining outcomes.

Limitations:

Participants and therapists were not blinded.

Conclusions:

Wii Fit U exercises improved pain self-efficacy at 6 months, and pain and function immediately postintervention in older people with chronic LBP, but the clinical importance of these changes is questionable. Wii Fit U exercises had no effect on care-seeking, physical activity, disability, fear of movement/reinjury, or falls efficacy.

PMID:
30247715
DOI:
10.1093/ptj/pzy112

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