Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Otolaryngol. 2019 Jan - Feb;40(1):52-56. doi: 10.1016/j.amjoto.2018.08.003. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

The effects of nasal decongestion on obstructive sleep apnoea.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing TongRen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Ministry of Education, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
2
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing TongRen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.
3
Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Beijing TongRen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China; Key Laboratory of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Ministry of Education, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. Electronic address: handemindoc@126.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Many studies have indicated associations between impaired nasal breathing and sleep disorders. However, the precise nature of the relationship between nasal patency and sleep remains unclear.

PURPOSE:

We analysed the effects of nasal patency on sleep architecture and breath in nasal obstruction-predominant obstructive sleep apnoea (NO-OSA) patients by applying nasal decongestant.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

A randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind crossover study was performed in OSA patients with chronic nasal obstruction and without obvious pharyngeal narrowing. All OSA patients (confirmed by polysomnography) were recruited and completed 2 overnight studies (randomly applying oxymetazoline or placebo). Data collected after oxymetazoline or placebo treatments were compared. The ClinicalTrials.gov identifier is NCT03506178.

RESULTS:

Compared with placebo, oxymetazoline resulted in significant increase in rapid eye movement sleep (p = 0.027) and reduction of stage 1 sleep (p = 0.004), as well as arousal index (p = 0.002). Moreover, great improvements in apnoea/hypopnea index (AHI) were observed (p < 0.001); AHI in the supine position was significantly reduced (p = 0.001). Oxygen saturation during sleep was increased significantly [mean oxygen saturation (p = 0.005) and lowest oxygen saturation (p = 0.024)]. Oxygen desaturation index was significantly reduced (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Improving nasal patency by decongestant could improve sleep quality, AHI, and oxygen saturation level during sleep.

KEYWORDS:

Nasal decongestion; Nasal obstruction; Obstructive sleep apnoea; Polysomnography; Sleep disorder

PMID:
30243839
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjoto.2018.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center