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J Subst Abuse Treat. 2018 Nov;94:69-73. doi: 10.1016/j.jsat.2018.08.010. Epub 2018 Aug 28.

Associations between marijuana use and tobacco cessation outcomes in young adults.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 810, San Francisco, CA 94117, USA. Electronic address: erin.vogel@ucsf.edu.
2
Division of Adolescent & Young Adult Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, 3333 California Street, Suite 245, San Francisco, CA 94118, USA.
3
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, 1265 Welch Road, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, 350 Parnassus Avenue, Suite 810, San Francisco, CA 94117, USA.

Abstract

Marijuana and tobacco co-use is common among young adults, and findings are mixed regarding the association between marijuana use and smoking cessation outcomes. This study examined the longitudinal relationships between marijuana use and smoking cessation outcomes among young adults (aged 18-25 years; N = 500) enrolled in a 3-month smoking cessation intervention on Facebook. At baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months, participants reported their marijuana use and their smoking behaviors (seven-day point prevalence abstinence from smoking, cigarettes per day, quit attempts) and readiness to quit. Longitudinal analyses controlled for experimental condition and adjusted for baseline stage of change, baseline average cigarettes per day, sex, alcohol use, and age participants began smoking regularly. Use of marijuana by young adult smokers was associated with a lower likelihood of reduced smoking (OR = 0.71, 95% CI [0.51, 0.98], p = .036) and a lower likelihood of abstaining from smoking (OR = 0.56, 95% CI [0.35, 0.90], p = .017) in the past seven days, as assessed over 12 months of follow-up. Use of marijuana was not significantly associated with perceptions of or engagement in the smoking cessation intervention, stage of change for quitting smoking, or tobacco quit attempts (all p's > 0.08). Study findings indicate that while marijuana use is unrelated to motivation to quit tobacco and engage in cessation interventions, marijuana use is associated with less success in reducing and abstaining from tobacco. Additional support and targeted tobacco cessation strategies to address challenges associated with marijuana co-use may be needed.

KEYWORDS:

Cannabis; Marijuana; Smoking; Tobacco; Young adult

PMID:
30243420
PMCID:
PMC6190592
[Available on 2019-11-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsat.2018.08.010

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