Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Crit Care. 2018 Sep 23;22(1):232. doi: 10.1186/s13054-018-2157-z.

The global burden of sepsis: barriers and potential solutions.

Author information

1
International Respiratory and Severe Illness Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ruddk@pitt.edu.
2
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ruddk@pitt.edu.
3
Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 3550 Terrace St., Scaife Hall, #639, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. ruddk@pitt.edu.
4
Division of Critical Care, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
5
Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
6
Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
7
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Calmette Hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia.
8
Bwindi Community Hospital, Kanungu, Uganda.
9
Departments of Critical Care and Emergency Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
10
Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC Health System, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
11
International Respiratory and Severe Illness Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
12
Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
13
Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.

Abstract

Sepsis is a major contributor to the global burden of disease. The majority of sepsis cases and deaths are estimated to occur in low and middle-income countries. Barriers to reducing the global burden of sepsis include difficulty quantifying attributable morbidity and mortality, low awareness, poverty and health inequity, and under-resourced and low-resilience public health and acute health care delivery systems. Important differences in the populations at risk, infecting pathogens, and clinical capacity to manage sepsis in high and low-resource settings necessitate context-specific approaches to this significant problem. We review these challenges and propose strategies to overcome them. These strategies include strengthening health systems, accurately identifying and quantifying sepsis cases, conducting inclusive research, establishing data-driven and context-specific management guidelines, promoting creative clinical interventions, and advocacy.

KEYWORDS:

Health resources; Low-income countries; Poverty; Public health; Sepsis

PMID:
30243300
PMCID:
PMC6151187
DOI:
10.1186/s13054-018-2157-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center